From the beginning, Whole Child International has dedicated significant time, resources, and funding to doing research and evaluation of the work that we do. This has been essential to demonstrate results and impact, but it also guides our program development. For instance, if we find that some results are not as effective or as well sustained as we had hoped, through evaluation we can carefully analyze and pull apart the pieces of our program to determine where we need to grow further.

As part of our research in El Salvador, Dr. Tomas Matza, an anthropologist and ethnographer from the University of Pittsburgh, has been providing invaluable insight into the caregiver experience prior to, throughout, and after our work improving the quality of care in their centers. We work intensively with the caregivers, providing them training followed by on-site hands-on coaching and mentoring in applying what they have learned, so it’s invaluable to carefully understand what helps the caregivers — and therefore  the lives of the children they care for.

Tomas first visited in June 2015, and he is back in-country working with the team of local ethnographers as part of the post-intervention assessment. He is also meeting with government officials to learn more about their experience in our university certificate program, and how this has changed their perspective and practice. We are looking forward to the new insights gained from this process.